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Spearhead infection control products

Ben Kilbey, Business Development Manager at Spearhead Healthcare

Every care manager knows that a systematic, structured approach to cleaning is the only way to keep infections at bay and to protect residents and carers effectively – as well as your own reputation.

Based on our extensive experience of helping hundreds of care homes like yours implement a best-practice infection control programme, here are our three guiding principles to set you on the right course.

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Care home closes after CQC remove operator's registration

A care home operator has had his Care Quality Commission (CQC) registration cancelled following a rating of “inadequate” in a recent inspection.

The CQC took the action to cancel the registration of Mr Thurairatnam Nadarajah Prakash and he is now no longer legally allowed to provide care at his service Durham Care Homes in Hull.

The CQQ said in a statement: “The latest inspection, in February 2019, rated the service inadequate overall and it was placed into special measures. The inspection revealed a significant deterioration in the care being provided and inspectors began the process to take enforcement action.

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Chris, Hannah and Molly with their work experience week awards

ELDERLY residents have expressed their gratitude to two school pupils after a week working at their care home.

15-year-olds Hannah Pears and Molly Ratcliff supported staff and spent time with residents living at Pelton Grange Care Home, in Pelton, County Durham.

The pupils from North Durham Academy, in Stanley, provided support with the tea trolley and dining, general housekeeping and social activities.

Hannah said: “I had a great week. I had a lot of fun listening to the stories of the residents.”

Molly added: “I never thought about what it was like in a care home. It was nice to see the residents had so much choice.”

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Smart Home Social Care - Carer & elderly man on ipad

As the population ages, the demand for high quality carers rises. By 2026 it’s predicted that the UK will need around 420,000 more carers, but with the current vacancy rate high and the amount of those showing interest in the care sector diminishing, it’s important that technology is utilised in order to help fill the gaps and provide the best social care possible. Some countries are already embracing technologies in their infancy such as smart home devices and robotics in order to enhance their care levels. Japan, for example, has made care bots prominent in its Shin-tomi nursing home and has committed to funding the development of more devices.

The UK has been slower to adopt technology into its healthcare system but changes are starting to be made. For example, in 2017 Southend-on-Sea was the first council to employ a humanoid robot to assist older people with certain tasks. Is this just the start? Could the future see each elderly or vulnerable individual accompanied by humanoids? It’s clear we’re not there yet, but in the meantime what else could be done? Helen Dempster, Chief Visionary Officer, Karantis360, discusses how human and bot could soon work together to improve domiciliary care.

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Flexible caring - Christian Brøndum is CEO of Planday

Christian Brøndum is the CEO of Planday, a start-up that provides workforce management software to businesses working across all sectors including both hospitality and care homes. Here, he tells Care & Nursing Essentials about how software can help deal with the challenges of retaining staff…

Recently, Carers UK announced the results of a report which found that over 600 people quit their job every day to prioritise caring for older and disabled relatives. Anyone working in the care sector will be familiar with the unique stresses of caring for an elderly or disabled person. Perhaps even more stressful is the fact that often, employers fail to provide the flexibility necessary for workers to keep their jobs whilst caring for their loved ones. Whether you work in the care sector or find yourself struggling to care for relatives whilst working, the need for flexibility is a pressing issue.

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TWIDDLEMUFFS and dolls have been donated to a North Yorkshire care home to help residents with dementia.

Twiddlemuffs and dolls have been donated to a North Yorkshire care home to help residents with dementia.

Volunteers from two separate groups knitted and donated the therapeutic items to Sycamore Hall Care Home, in Ripon.

The Ripon Cathedral group of the Mothers’ Union Diocese of Leeds dropped off around a dozen handmade twiddlemuffs at the home.

While the volunteer group Comfort Dolls and Twiddles for People With Dementia made a separate donation of twiddlemuffs and several comfort dolls.

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The Beeches Care Home deputy manager Rachel Harris, home manager Jess Brown and carer Amy Trattles with resident Janet Wren when they dropped off donations to the neonatal unit at University Hospital of North Tees on Random Act of Kindness Day.

RANDOM Act of Kindness Day saw care home staff and residents donating a trove of supplies for Teesside’s newborns.

Nappies, beanie hats, mittens, blankets, sleepsuits, nappy sacks and baby wipes were among the items collected at The Beeches Care Home, Green Lane, Stockton-on-Tees, following an appeal.

Staff, family members and residents were among those who donated.

The items were wrapped into gift parcels for new mums and their babies on the neonatal unit at University Hospital of North Tees.

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A TEESSIDE care home transformed into a pizzeria for the day as residents baked their own Italian creations. National Pizza Day was celebrated by staff and residents at The Beeches Care Home, on Green Lane, Stockton-on-Tees.

Alwyn Behan, 86, Marian Knightly, 83, Jane Monaghan, 72, and Sylvia Smith, 77, were among those who created their own pizzas.

The residents chose their favourite toppings, including pepperoni, chicken, ham, and a variety of vegetables, before baking them in the oven.

Care home turns into pizzeria for National Pizza Day
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Great Oaks care home welcomes soft food diet specialist

Great Oaks in Bournemouth has appointed a soft food diet specialist to allow for a wide range of diet requirements to be catered for at the care home.

Patrick Fensterseifer, head chef at Great Oaks, specialises in the production of dysphagia meals which means he is able to cook dishes for residents who have difficulties with swallowing. Patrick is passionate about preparing meals that are flavoursome, nutritious, well-presented and meet the specific dietary requirements of every resident. 

As a Dorset Healthcare NHS dysphagia practitioner, Patrick has a wealth of knowledge which has enabled him to lead the rest of catering team confidently and help expand their skills and understanding of the disorder. Patrick has more than 18 years’ experience as a head chef and has demonstrated to the rest of the team that it is still possible to be creative when catering for a resident who requires a soft food diet.

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St Budeaux Pupils Get Creative

Residents at a care home in Plymouth say that regular visits from pupils of nearby St Budeaux Foundation School are ‘a breath of fresh air.’ 

The Year 4 pupils come to see their older friends at Freshfields care home as part of the Archie Project, a scheme that links local schools with people with dementia. 

Freshfields’ activities co-ordinator Paul Hutt said: “This is the fourth year that St Budeaux children have been coming here and our residents just love their visits. 

“They sit side by side and enjoy a whole different variety of activities when they come here.  

“On their most recent visit they did seasonal arts and crafts activities.” 

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Care Home Celebrates Outstanding Report From CQC

Staff at a Plymouth residential care home are celebrating after the service was given the Care Quality Commission’s highest rating following a recent inspection. After its previous CQC inspection in January 2016, Restormel House was given an overall rating of good. But following its latest inspection, in September this year, it has been upgraded to outstanding.

Carla Dearing, who has been manager of the service for four-and-a-halfyears, said: “I’m so pleased that the hard work, commitment and passion demonstrated by the staff here has been rewarded with the CQC’s highest rating.

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New starter rescue

New starter at Hilton Nursing Partners, personal nursing assistant Lilly Schwarz, used her quick thinking to safeguard a 95 year old patient from a potentially life-threatening situation as an electrical fire took hold. 

Only 12 days in her new role, new starter Lilly’s responsibility to assess patients after their discharge from hospital quickly went from a routine task, to that of a life saving situation when she was met at the patient’s home with panic and plumes of toxic smoke.

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Longmore Lodge Poppy gown created by care home in tribute to veterans

A POPPY gown has been created by a Sandiacre care home residents to mark the centenary of the end of the First World War. The elaborate frock has been covered in handmade poppies of different sizes and is adorned with the phrase: “Lest we forget”.

Residents at Longmoor Lodge Care Home, on Longmoor Lane, came up with the idea after informing care home staff they wanted to do something special for the centenary. Treetops Hospice charity shop, on Derby Road, loaned a manikin to the care home for the project.

Residents then painted paper plates and cut them into poppy shapes before attaching them to the gown.
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